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Pastoral Poetry

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Christopher Marlowe | Sir Walter Raleigh | The Passionate Shepherd To His Love | The Nymph's Reply To The Shepherd | Works Cited
Christopher Marlowe

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Biography

Career- poet, playwright
*Marlowe was the son of John and Catherine Marlowe.
*His father was a shoemaker.
* He was born the same year as William Shakespeare in February 1564 in Canterbury England.
*He attended the King's school, and was awarded a scholarship to study for the ministry at Cambridge.
*He obtained his bachelors in 1584 and masters in 1587 at Corpus Christi College.
* He was involved with secret service work for the government during his university years.
*He died of a stab wound in a brawl at a tavern. Some say the he was assassinated by his companions as a result of his secret service work.
* He died at the age of twenty-nine, when Shakespeare was beginning his dramatic work.
*Marlowe built the foundation on which many of the English writers would build such as Shakespeare.
* He was the first great Elizabethan writer of tragedy, and the first to reveal the full potential of blank verse poetry.
*He made great advances in the genre of English tragedy through the "examination of Renaissance morality."
*He was greatly influenced by the Elizabethan period including the Renaissance and the Protestant Reformation, and Niccolo Machiavelli's political manifest, The Prince.
* His plays include: The Tragedy of Dido Queen of Carthage,
Tamburlaine the Great, The Famous Tragedy of the Rich Jew of Malta, The Massacre at Paris: with the Dearth of the Duke of Guise, The Troublesome Raigne and Lamentable Death of Edward the Second, King of England, and the
Tragicall History of Doctor Faustus.
*His non-dramatic works include the unfinished Hero and Leander, a narrative poem, and a pastoral lyric, The Passionate Shepherd to His Love.
*Marlowe's shepherd was first introduced in Tamburlaine. *The shepherd, a heroic figure, epitomizes the Renaissance Man.



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